A new dictionary of the English language: containing, not only the explanation of words, with their orthography, etymology, and idiomatic use in writing; but likewise, their orthoepia or pronunciation in speech, according to the present practice of polished speakers in the metropolis? to which is prefixed a Rhetorical Grammar? WILLIAM KENRICK.
A new dictionary of the English language: containing, not only the explanation of words, with their orthography, etymology, and idiomatic use in writing; but likewise, their orthoepia or pronunciation in speech, according to the present practice of polished speakers in the metropolis? to which is prefixed a Rhetorical Grammar?

A new dictionary of the English language: containing, not only the explanation of words, with their orthography, etymology, and idiomatic use in writing; but likewise, their orthoepia or pronunciation in speech, according to the present practice of polished speakers in the metropolis? to which is prefixed a Rhetorical Grammar?

London: printed for John and Francis Rivington, William Johnston, Thomas Longman and Thomas Cadell, 1773. First and only edition, 4to, pp. [8], viii, 57, [1], plus unpaginated lexicon in double column; mid 20th century half calf over marbled boards, gilt-decorated spine, red morocco label; overall appearance is fine. A "hack writer" who possessed a "strong love of notoriety, [and] a jealous and perverse temper," Kenrick (?1725-1779) "was often drunk and violent. He became the enemy of every decent and successful person, and so notorious as a libeler that few condescended to answer him. His vanity lead him to fancy himself equal to any task without serious study. In his later years Kenrick seldom wrote without a bottle of brandy at his elbow. Though a superlative scoundrel, he was clever, and especially proud of the rapidity of his writing; even his more serious works seldom occupied him for more than two days" (see DNB for a lively account of this literary curmudgeon). Among those most frequently attacked and offended were Johnson and Boswell, Garrick, Goldsmith, Fielding, and, predictably, other famous men, who, by association would give Kendrick a name. For all his attacks on Johnson (Kenrick was violently critical of Johnson's edition of Shakespeare and his dictionary) he seems to have made good use of Johnson's lexicographic skills. A spot check of entries shows Kenrick's lexicon to be a word-for-word transcription from that of Johnson. Alston V, 283; Kennedy 6276. Item #34076

Price: $1,750.00

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