An essay on the art of decyphering. In which is inserted a discourse of Dr. Wallis. Now first publish'd from his original manuscript in the publick library at Oxford. John Davys.
An essay on the art of decyphering. In which is inserted a discourse of Dr. Wallis. Now first publish'd from his original manuscript in the publick library at Oxford

An essay on the art of decyphering. In which is inserted a discourse of Dr. Wallis. Now first publish'd from his original manuscript in the publick library at Oxford

London: printed for L. Gilliver and J. Clarke, 1737. First edition, 4to, pp. [4], iii, [1], 58, [1] ads; woodcut head- and tailpieces, and initials; tables and codes in the text; an uncut copy in contemporary if not original marbled boards with a paper backstrip, the paper with 2 or 3 small breaks; in all, a very nice copy in a new green cloth clamshell case. Bookplate of the South Library, Earls of Macclesfield, with 4 small pressure stamps. Davys was, according to his own account, was versed in the art of deciphering from his youth, and could produce witnesses of undoubted reputation, who had tried him with letters in cipher, generally to find his deciphering to be correct ... Unlike John Falconer's Cryptomenysis Patefacta (1685), which described various kinds of ciphers and deciphering thereof, Davys focuses on numerical code, which was the mainstream cipher at the time. His aim was to inform the public that the art of deciphering had a solid basis, despite some arguments circulated at the time that deciphering was nothing but conjectures" (Tomokiyo, S.). John Wallis (1616-1703), the famous mathematician, was a code-breaker during the English Civil War. Alston III, 806. Macclesfield, Science, 602 (this copy, and the only copy to appear at auction in almost 40 years). Item #43250

Price: $9,500.00

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