An American note never intended for general circulation although issued at the seat of government in March 1842. Charles Dickens.

An American note never intended for general circulation although issued at the seat of government in March 1842

[Shandygraft Farm, Charles River, Mass.]: Sign of the George, [1924]. Limited edition of an unknown quantity, approx. 6½" x 5", pp. [16]; original plain green paper wrappers; generally fine. This copy initialed by the printer, George Parker Winship at the end of his prefatory note. The text prints for the first time Dickens's candid letter to Charles Sumner. "All the work is set by hand in monotype Caslon, and no statement is ever made of the number of copies printed ... No press could operate in greater privacy and freedom than the Sign of the George, maintained by the George Parker Winships, I and II. Mr. Winship says: 'The thing has been a plaything from the start and I've refused to spoil it for myself by allowing it to be formalized. If the press has any policy, it has to print things of literary interest - but of no importance.' The Sign of the George is technically the property of George Parker Winship, Jr., as the hand press was a Christmas gift when he was just past six years old." Podeschi, pp. 173-74; Ransom, Private Presses, no. 9. Item #49336

Price: $150.00

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