Synopsis of a grammar of the Karen language, embracing both dialects, Sgau and Pgho, or Sho. Francis Mason.
Synopsis of a grammar of the Karen language, embracing both dialects, Sgau and Pgho, or Sho

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Synopsis of a grammar of the Karen language, embracing both dialects, Sgau and Pgho, or Sho

Tavoy: [printed and published at the] Karen Mission Press [by C. Bennett. for the American Baptist Mission], 1846. First edition, 4to, pp. viii, 458; old pebble-grain brown cloth neatly rebacked in brown calf, gilt-lettered spine; near fine, and sound. Inscribed: "Society of [??], Newton Theol. Institution, Mass. From C. Bennett, Tavoy." American missionaries first arrived among the Karen tribes in 1828. It was apparently impracticable for them to set up a printing-press in the wild country of the Shan states, but they did so several hundred miles farther south, at Tavoy. The Karen were one of the chief tribes of Burma, supposed to be descendants of Chinese tribes driven southwards, ultimately from Mongolian lands. The Karen language is tonal, and belongs to the Siamese-Chinese branch of the Indo-Chinese family. The first book of the press appears to be Jonathan Wade's unfinished Karen dictionary (Tavoy ca. 1842-44). In 1843 Francis Mason published a New Testament printed at the same press, and in 1846 the Rev. Cephas Bennett published there An Anglo-Karen Vocabulary, the same year as this Karen grammar by Mason. Not in Vancil; Aston Catalogue, p. 129. Item #50029

Price: $3,500.00

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