Making bread dear. A controversy between Wheelbarrow and Sympathizer upon corners and the board of trade with reference to the labor question. Matthew Marks Trumbull, & Lyman J. Gage.

Making bread dear. A controversy between Wheelbarrow and Sympathizer upon corners and the board of trade with reference to the labor question

Chicago: The Open Court Publishing Company, [1889]. 8vo, pp. 32; original tan paper wrappers; a scarce title and a near fine copy with only some soiling to the covers, in a new clamshell box.

An exchange between Wheelbarrow (Trumbull) and a Sympathizer (Lyman), triggered by an open letter in response to an article in The North American review by Henry D. Lloyd. Trumbull was an English immigrant to the US who had experienced the misery of poverty and the effects of debtor's prison in England. Eventually, after careers in hard labor and the military, he became a lawyer, and from this position was actively engaged against what he called the "rich criminal classes." While he disavowed anarchism, he made a personal appeal for pardon on behalf of the men convicted during the Haymarket affair, the conclusion of which accelerated his political activity.

Lyman, by contrast, was a career financer an politician, serving as President of the First National Bank of Chicago, and Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt. Despite their political differences, an acquaintance of Trumbull calls Lyman a "close personal friend of his." Their public debate concerns wages, labor, and the cost of goods. Item #50081

Price: $375.00

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