A pair of pro-forma documents accomplished in manuscript regarding a particular tract of land in Richmond County granted to John Forsyth, Governor of Georgia, 1827-29. John Forsyth, Governor.

The governor grants himself a parcel of land

A pair of pro-forma documents accomplished in manuscript regarding a particular tract of land in Richmond County granted to John Forsyth, Governor of Georgia, 1827-29.

1809 and 1828. Both documents tied together with silk ribbon at the bottom, to which is attached a ceramic Georgia state seal. The first is a survey of land, approx. 9½" x 7½" with a small manuscript plat map at the top showing a parcel of 202 acres of John Forsyth of Richmond (originally Wilkinson) County, dated 16 March, 1807, and signed by the Surveyor General John Bethune, and the surveyors themselves, Robert Walton and Samuel Hogan. The second document, slightly larger, is a land grant for the same parcel, signed by Forsyth as Governor. Docketed on the verso "Grant to John Forsyth for Lot 53-19th Wilkinson, 15 November, 1828..." Of particular interest is the seal of the State of Georgia, measuring 2½" in diameter, showing on the obverse the coat of arms of the state: an arch with three columns, the arch symbolizing the state's Constitution and the columns representing the three branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial). The words of the official state motto, "Wisdom, Justice, Moderation," are inscribed on scrolls that are wrapped around the columns. A man (possibly a soldier from the American Revolution) stands between the second and third columns, holding a drawn sword in his right hand, representing the military's defense of the Constitution. A border surrounds the coat of arms, the motto "State of Georgia" is inscribed outside the arms, and the date 1799 is at the bottom. The reverse of the seal contains an image of Georgia's coast, with a ship bearing the American flag arriving to take aboard tobacco and cotton, symbolizing Georgia's export trade. The ship and flag in this example are worn and somewhat indistinguishable. Towards the left of the image, there is a man plowing and a flock of sheep. The motto "Agriculture and Commerce, 1776" is inscribed around the outside of the image. From the website devoted to Georgia's governors we learn that John Forsyth was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on October 22, 1780. He attended Springer Academy in Wilkes County, Georgia, and graduated from Princeton University in 1799. After moving to Augusta, Georgia, he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1802, and started his legal career. Forsyth entered politics in 1808 as an attorney general of Georgia. He served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from March 4, 1813, until his resignation on November 23, 1818, and then served in the U.S. Senate from November 23, 1818, until February 17, 1819. He was appointed minister of Spain, serving from 1819 to 1823, and served again in the U.S. House of Representatives from March 4, 1823, until his resignation on November 7, 1827. On October 1, 1827, Forsyth won election to Georgia's governorship, and on November 7, 1827, he was sworn into office. During his tenure, he criticized the 1828 "Tariff of Abominations," and endorsed the option of counteracting it with state action. Forsyth finished his term on November 4, 1829, and continued to stay active in public service. He served again in the U.S. Senate from November 9, 1829, until June 27, 1834, when he resigned to take an appointment as U.S. Secretary of State. President Martin Van Buren reappointed him to the cabinet post, where he served until March 4, 1841. Item #51058

Price: $950.00

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