Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports. R. L. Atwell.
Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports
Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports
Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports
Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports
Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports
Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports

Experiments I - XIII. U.S. Submarine School, Electrical Department ... Laboratory Reports

New London: October 2 - October 24, 1918. A collection of 13 reports on storage batteries by Atwell, as follows. All 4to, all text mimeographed in printed wrappers, all with manuscript additions, drawings, tables, graphs, etc. Approximately 85 leaves printed and/or with manuscript on rectos only; cover of Report One is slightly tattered with worm holes, the remainder of reports toned, but very good. Rare Electrical Department Laboratory reports from the early days of the United States submarine school in New London, Connecticut. Founded in 1916, the present Naval Submarine School is the Center of Submarine Training Excellence for the United States Navy. Titles of the reports have to do with the characteristics of lead and Edison cell storage batteries including the influences of temperature and specific gravity. The reports include hand and type written notes on printed forms along with log sheets and charts. Batteries were obviously crucial to sustainable submarine operation. Swedish inventor Waldemar Jungner had invented the nickel–cadmium battery in 1899. The battery was developed by Thomas Edison in 1901 and Edison's batteries were made from about 1903 to 1972 by the Edison Storage Battery Company in East Orange, N.J. The author of these reports was Robert LeRoy Atwell who was born in Virginia in 1892 to E. H. and Eva B. (Pittinger) Atwell. He enlisted in the Navy in 1917 and in 1918 was an Ensign at the Submarine Base in New London. He graduated from the University of Virginia and married Lucy Williams. Atwell later became a property owner, stockholder, and corporation president of the English Village Corporation of Richmond, Virginia, a housing cooperative and planned community begun in 1927. Cooperatives were, at the time, an innovative form of ownership. He also had a career as an engineer. Atwell died in 1971. When the first class of twenty four officers began studies for submarine duty in the summer of 1916, the submarine base in Groton, Connecticut was little more than a handful of buildings scattered across the area now known as Lower Base. By Christmas 1916, the twenty two graduates of the first submarine officers' course were heading out for assignments after spending six months in training on submarines, torpedoes, engineering and electricity. Records are sketchy on the nature of much of that training-especially since the bulk of the early trainers were salvage material from decommissioned submarines. Within a year the submarine officers, and those who followed them through Naval Submarine School, were serving around the globe as the United States entered World War I. From one building on Lower Base in 1916, Naval Submarine School has grown to the largest single tenant unit on the Submarine Base, with nearly forty thousand sailors graduating annually from nearly two hundred different courses. [http://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/slc/nss/CommandInfo.aspx?ID=3]. Item #53911

Price: $750.00

See all items in Americana, Maritime, Science
See all items by