A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie. Albert Edward Winchester.
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie
A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie

By a mapper of electricity and a colleague of Edison

A collection of 19 illustrated autograph letters and two illustrated autograph poems on approximately 85 pages, including six letters to his mother, Anna M. Jackson, and 17 more to his sweetheart and later wife, Carrie

Ithaca & Brooklyn, NY: 1880-1893. From the Electrical World and Engineer, volume XLVI, no. 14 (September 30, 1905): "Albert Edward Winchester of New England and southern ancestry was born April 19, 1867 at Marietta, Ohio. His father Theodore H. Winchester, deceased, was an editor and artist, and an inventor of printing appliances. His mother, Anna Maud Jackson, was an educator and a worker in various lines of literature. His early education was received in Ithaca and New York City. At the age of 14 he accompanied his mother to Mexico and there being no suitable schools for American youth in those days, and having already developed a strong inclination toward constructive mechanics, he became an apprentice in the motive power department of the Mexican Central Railroad which was then being built to the United States." The early letters dated 1880-1885 are those of a tender teenager showing much affection towards his mother, and displaying an early talent for penwork and illustration. He notes in one that he now weighs 120 pounds. "Don't you think I am too big to cuddle up in your lap as I used to do? I think if I was with you I would reverse the case and call you my baby, that is if Mr. Dennie would not get jealous, because I am afraid he would have a great cause to be so, as I don't think there would be much left of you after I had got done kissing and hugging you." The illustrations on the early letters consist of steamboats and trains, birds, dogs, ducks, castles and churches, but by 1886, when he is writing to his future wife, the penwork has matured considerably and shows extraordinary detail, employing proficient calligraphy, composite drawing, and trompe d'oeil. Albert, or "Bertie" as he signs himself, was by then drawing electrical maps as part of his day job, and it may be no wonder that his skills as an artist flowed from the detailed and complex electrical designs. Again, from the Electrical World and Engineer: "On completing his term in 1883 he was sent to the United States to qualify for college and took a preparatory course at the Whitlock Academy in Wilton, Connecticut. Having become deeply interested in electricity, instead of entering college at the conclusion of his academic career he became the youngest member of the parent Edison Company's engineering staff and continued with the various organizations of that company in line of succession from draftsman to consulting engineer until the formation of the General Electric Company with which he remained until 1893, when he became a member of the Electrical & Mechanical Engineering Company of New York, and also its superintendent of construction for three ensuing years." Albert's work obviously kept him away from home, hence the correspondence between him and his beloved Carrie. The letters are long, filled with love and longing, and time-consuming illustrations: hearts and chains, anvils and arrows, prosceniums and signposts, anchors and books. The letters are long on love and but short on content: he describes a sermon by Dr. Talbridge, a trip to a waterfall, the burning of a barn, a wind storm which took roofs off houses, among other events, but the letters are long on infatuation, trust, jealousy. The series of letters ends with the most lengthy, a 14-page letter written on the couple's fifth anniversary. "Five happy years have come and gone since that day when you, my darling became my cherished wife, yet as I look back it seems but yesterday, and then again as I think over my past life your sweet bright eyes look at me from every eventful picture of bygone years as though you had always been connected with my existence..." "During 1896-97 Mr. Winchester was on the engineering staff of the New York Edison Illuminating Company. From that time to the present he has held the position of general superintendent of the city of South Norwalk Electric Works having designed and supervised the construction of this plant back in 1892. From 1892 to 1902 he served as one of the electrical commissioners of South Norwalk, and in the latter year was appointed city electrical engineer, retaining also the position and duties of general superintendent of the municipal plant. In the line of invention Mr. Winchester never took out any patents holding that those who employed him were entitled to his efforts. He is the originator of one of the first practical quick-brake switches for heavy currents, the principles of which are in general use today. The sectional iron bracket pole for supplying trolley lines was developed by him. He invented an early car motor controller and aided in the evolution of one that later became standard. He contributed many improvements and modifications to trolley line construction and appliances to which work he was assigned for a considerable period of time. He was also frequently detailed on specialty lines of work under the direction of Mr. Edison." "Darling, do you think of me often? Remember, I am working for you, and may the day come when I receive my precious reward. I think of you night and day and would like to ask your dear wise advice so many times a day about many different things, but little love, pray for me, and I know God will help me do what is right ... May God who knows our every thought be with us in all that we do and give us wisdom to do what it right." "Mr. Winchester's specially, however, was largely in the line of power station engineering, and he participated in the designing of over 100 electric lighting and the street railway power plants, of which some were erected under his personal supervision. Among the important lighting plants in the designing of which Mr. Winchester took an active part where the early Edison stations at New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cincinnati, San Francisco, New Orleans, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Detroit, Providence, Paterson, and many others. He was one of the engineers connected with the construction of the Richmond Electric Street Railway (the pioneer road of the old Sprague Electric Railway and Motor Company) the Sprague Road at Scranton and various others. Mr. Winchester is a member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and an honorary member of the National Association of Stationary Engineers." Accompanying the letters are three hand-drawn invitations, almost certainly by Albert, to an "Evening Party" on March 7, 1888; two manuscript poems (both illustrated); five illustrated envelopes; four small drawings: "My room looking in from door"; "A moon light glide"; "One-thousand ton lighter and steam tug"; and the initials "C.A.D.W." made from drawings of logs. Also, a small broadside printed in Mexico announcing to American citizens there the death of President Garfield (not found in OCLC); an illustrated card with a lock of hair; an old tintype of a married couple (perhaps Albert's parents); two of Albert's embossed business cards, and two early 20th century photographs of a woman (presumably Carrie). Two of the letters are incomplete, missing their last page; one is bound with a blue silk ribbon, one has scalloped edges made by Albert, one has a red wax seal with a red ribbon still attached. Hard to say what I think about these letters, especially the ones where he utterly dotes on his mother which may help explain the need he has for Carrie's affections and companionship. Frankly, there's a certain amount of creepiness to this collection, and a weird morbidity to the more mature illustrations. Item #54498

Price: $3,750.00

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