Item #56259 Proceedings of the Town of Providence. The Resolutions...officially detailed below, were, after full discussion and mature deliberation, almost unanimously adopted by the most numerous Town-Meeting ever held in this town...The object of this meeting being to take into consideration the Alarming Situation of the Country, arising from the Embargo Laws. Nathan Waterman Jackson, town clerk.

Proceedings of the Town of Providence. The Resolutions...officially detailed below, were, after full discussion and mature deliberation, almost unanimously adopted by the most numerous Town-Meeting ever held in this town...The object of this meeting being to take into consideration the Alarming Situation of the Country, arising from the Embargo Laws

Providence: printed by J. Carter, [1809]. Broadside (approx. 20½" x 12½"), text in quadruple column; uniformly toned, previous folds split, but with neat, professional repair on the verso; several words lost, old creasing; manuscript docket on verso, with the date February 25, 1809. A cataloguing note to an electronic version recorded in OCLC contains the following: "Proceedings and resolutions of a meeting of the freemen of Providence, held on January 28, 1809, its object being to take into consideration the alarming situation of the country, arising from the several embargo laws, and especially the last, and to adopt such measures as may be thought proper for the security and safety of our rights and liberties." Signed [in type]: Nathan W. Jackson, town-clerk. This is followed by the text of "An act to enforce and make more effectual an act, entitled An act laying an embargo on all ships and vessels in the ports and harbours of the United States, and the several acts supplementary thereto, passed January 9, 1809." Concludes with the following statement: "For the information of the public, it is thought expedient to state that at the Town-Meeting above mentioned, that venerable Friend and Patriot, Moses Brown Esq. (who is no party man) pronounced, with great emphasis and spirit, the last Embargo Act to be the most oppressive and tyrannical he had ever read; and that the man GILES, who brought forward the Act, was, from his own personal knowledge, the Enemy of Washington." For all its good intentions, the Embargo Act of 1807 was a failure in the eyes of American merchants and traders. It undermined American unity and provoked bitter protests, especially in the commercial centers of New England, such as Providence. Replacement legislation for the ineffective embargo was enacted on March 1, 1809, just 4 days after the appearance of this broadside, in the last days of Jefferson's presidency. Tensions with Britain continued to grow nonetheless, and led to the War of 1812. Not in Kress. American Imprints 18466 and OCLC locating the Brown University copy only; Sabin 66296. Item #56259

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