Journal [of accounts]. William Henry Mosher.
Journal [of accounts]
Journal [of accounts]
Journal [of accounts]

Journal [of accounts]

Bristol, R.I., [et al.]: 1841 - 1850. Folio, 198 pages; mild dampstaining to the first 15 leaves, pages 2-5 in light blue ink, the balance in sepia; completely legible except at the tops of pages [3-5] where the damp obscures; contemporary calf-backed marbled boards, the covers loose, but present. Several pages of accounting are laid in, including a letter addressed to Nathaniel Coggeshall of Bristol stating accounts of May, 1840 with a Fall River postmark; and to the same Coggeshall, also with accounts, September 1843, with a New London postmark. Also, a large and neat folio accounting of "Amount Stock on Hand October 22, 1849," which bears directly on this journal (see below). Nathaniel Coggeshall was Mosher's brother-in-law. Mosher's name appears nowhere in this journal, except for his mention of paying rents to the Mosher estate. His name has been attributed because of his being owner and master of the ship Aquetnet (see Ship Documents of Rhode Island, Bristol - Warren 1773-1939, Providence: National Archives Project, 1941, pp. 16-17). A ten-year record of revenue and disbursements of William Henry Mosher of Bristol, R.I. (1798-1866), a sea captain and merchant. Much of the accounts relate to his ship the Aquetnet and various voyages to Africa, St. Helena, Canton, Charleston, Liverpool, Gothenberg, New Orleans, Mobile, and Havana and this journal accounts for his debits and credits for a variety of goods and services, including "outfit disbursements at Havana," "for bill of health made by Russian Consul," insurance, wharfage, commissions on freight, customs house charges, cigars, salt, tobacco, oranges, bread, chicopee, sheet copper, nails, wood, oil, apples, and one box of China palm leaf fans. Among his accounts are Charles Tyng (1801-1879), the famous sea captain and merchant, John Gilliat & Co., Fall River Iron Works, Gardner Willard, Sheldon C. Lewis, the Baring Brothers of London, Crocker Brothers, Phillipps & Tiplady, John Taylor, and Robert Rogers. He draws cash for expenses for children, for the passage of seamen from Fayal, for rent at the Mosher estate. Beginning in September of 1849 and going to May of 1850, the last 21 pages of this journal, much cash is withdrawn for expenses relating to a voyage to California. Some expenses were related to advertising so he likely was taking passengers: Caleb Gilmore, Charles Gilmore, Frederick Hilberg, and William Stirling are names that are mentioned as paying money to him. Also, for the "freight of Sewell & Mead." Mosher sells his "old canvas sails," although there is no mention of his purchasing new ones. The Aquetnet turns up in San Francisco April 4, 1852, after having been, apparently, in Hawaii. Quoting from his obituary in the Bristol Phoenix of January 4, 1867: "Captain Mosher was the son of the late captain Abner Mosher, one of the most prominent and enterprising shipmasters of his time. His first voyage was made in the capacity of cabin boy on board the celebrated privateer Yankee in the year 1813, Captain B. K. Churchill. He attained the highest rank of his profession of shipmaster, which position he occupied for more than 30 years, sustaining throughout a character for intelligence, enterprise, and integrity scarcely equaled. He became a Master Mason at Saint Albans Lodge, Bristol, of which his father was a founder, that fraternity conducting the services at his grave. I am informed that he served a number of times as Treasurer of the Lodge. The privateer Yankee captured many prizes and its cabin boys came back well to do. Therein, doubtless, lies the secret of Captain Mosher‘s continuing success. He loved books, wrote a fine hand, and one only wishes his logbooks might be found." Item #56516

Price: $2,250.00

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