Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents
Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents

Allyn Kellogg Ford Collection of Rhode Island documents

Providence, [et al.]: 1725-1840s. Thirty-one letters and documents in approximately 45 pages in all, some relating to prominent merchant traders; and many signed by prominent political figures. The collection of Allyn Kellogg Ford (1878-1964), a Minneapolis businessman, Minnesota president of the Sons of the American Revolution, a founder of the Minneapolis Better Business Bureau, and a charter member and secretary of the Minneapolis Rotary Club. This collection was sold en bloc in 2012 to benefit the Minnesota Historical Society. All letters and documents are on a single sheet unless otherwise noted. Condition overall is very good. 1) Manifest of the Cargo onboard the Brigantine Betsey of Providence, berthen On Hundreds and Seven 36/95 Tons by Register, John Arnold Master, being the Port or Place from whence she last visited. Providence, September 13, 1791. 1 p. Docketed on verso by Custom House, Jeremiah Olney, Collector on October 3, 1791. Sheet 8 x 13 in., folds, browning, slight tear at fold. The brigantine Betsey was owned by Welcome Arnold (1745-1798), a Providence merchant and long-time business partner of John Brown. He also operated a rum distillery and was the brother of Thomas Arnold, a leader of the Providence Abolition Society and one of the men determined to prosecute Brown for illegal slave trading. The cargo shows diverse items to be consigned to Stephen Dexter and to James Johnson of New York; brandy, wine, oil, olives, stockings and silk gloves, cloth, etc. 2) Autograph letter signed by S. G. Arnold. N.d. Dear Anna... regretting that he is unable to dine with her. Ca. 1840s (?) Sheet 4.5 x 7 inches. 1 p, bright ink. Samuel Greene Arnold, Jr. (1821–1880) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. Born in Providence, he graduated from Brown University in 1841 and, in 1845, the law department of Harvard University, gaining admission to the bar that year. He was a lawyer and historian, and was trustee of Brown University from 1848 to 1880. After his time in the Senate he returned to historical research and was president of the Rhode Island Historical Society from 1868 to 1880 and author of the History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations published in 1859-60. The letter might date prior to his marriage in 1848 to Louisa. 3) Daniel Henry Barnes, autograph letter signed to Rev. David Benedict of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. New York, September 28, 1825. 8 x 10 inches, 2 pp. Folded with integral address. Small hole at wax seal and slight tears at folds. Legible ink. Concerning ideas to promote the advancement of science which Benedict ultimately accomplished. Rev. Barnes suggests a visit to the Pawtucket Mechanic and Scientific Institution as a start and praises lyceums as important institutions. He promotes a wide scope of disciplines to reach a broad audience. Baptist Rev. Daniel Henry Barnes was born in Canaan, New York, in 1785, and graduated from Union College in 1809 and later Baptist Theological Seminary. Never a preacher, in 1824, (at the writing of this letter) he was associate principal of the New York High School for Boys, an institution he is said to have originated. A naturalist by avocation, Rev. Barnes was one of the chief promoters of the New York Lyceum of Natural History, now the New York Academy of Sciences. He assisted Webster in the preparation of his dictionary, and also published several early papers on the Unionidce and Chitons, some of which have been named in his honor. Rev. Barnes died prematurely by a fall from a stage coach on October 27, 1828. Rev. David Benedict (1779-1874) was a Brown University graduate and a published author of books, journals, and other religious press. He was also involved in setting up new churches and religious associations for education and philanthropy. 4) George R. Burrill, autograph letter signed, dated Providence, May 22, 1799, to John Hagadorn in South Kingstown, concerning music and the preacher Dehone of Bristol. Sheet 10 x 16 inches, folded in half with integral address. Docketed, wax seal. 5) Bill of Sale signed by "Geo. R. Burrill" as notary. Providence, February 12, 1801. Samuel W. Greene and John Barker, merchants and partners, sell the vessel Abigail to John Innes Clark of Providence. 8 x 13 inches, seal, bound at left with ribbon. 2 pp. Slight fraying at edges. Fine hand. George R. Burrill (1770-1818) was a prominent Federalist and mayor of Providence. He writes an amusing letter to John Hagadorn (1747-1813), a lawyer, "Dear Hag": of songs "the Little Sailor Boy" (a ballad published in Carr's Musical Repository in 1798 and "Megen Oh" (from Mrs. Rowson). Of preacher Dehone: "Our ladies I think are not less enamoured with him than those of Newport... I do not wonder at their partiality for him. I hope the poor young fellow will not be run away with." The bill of sale document is of interest since it was pertinent to a later U.S. Supreme Court case Clark's Executors vs. Carrington. 6) Ethan Clarke, autograph letter signed to His Excellency William Greene in Warwick concerning cargo on his sloop. Newport, October 28, 1783. 8.5 x 15 inches, folded in half with integral address; small hole at seal, no loss. Ethan Clarke (1745-1833) served during the Revolution and later got into shipping (the West Indies mercantile company Clarke and Hammond) and became quite wealthy. He married Anna, daughter of Governor Samuel Ward. In this letter to William Greene (likely Governor William Greene 1731-1809 and possibly a client or partner), he mentions that he has potatoes on his sloop and asks if he should purchase barrels for them. 7) James Smith Colburn, autograph letter signed to Hon. Tristam Burges in Washington, D.C. Charleston, S.C., May 7, 1828. 10.75 x 16 inches, folded in half with integral address, 1 pp. Edges rough. Fine hand. In this letter Colburn forwards Burges "the pamphlet of 'Hamilton'." James Smith Colburn (1780-1859) was born in Concord, Massachusetts, become a Boston merchant and was a partner with Thomas Otis in the merchant firm Otis & Colburn. They kept a London office which prospered from the start, making it possible, in May of 1799, for James to take in marriage Susan Lorimer, youngest daughter of a prominent London family. Sadly, she died on the voyage back to the United States and Colburn eventually moved to South Carolina. Tristam Burges (1770–1853) was a U.S. Representative from Rhode Island and great-great-uncle of Senator Theodore Francis Green. 8) Receipt signed by Henry Dayton, Captain. Newport, February 18, 1782. 3.5 x 7.5 inches. 1 pp. Lightly browned. Henry Dayton (1751-1792) was Recruiting Officer at Newport, in 1777 and 1781 and Captain of Light Infantry Corps in 1780. This is a receipt for wood to Benjamin Bourne, Rhode Island's first U.S. Representative in Congress. 9) James Fenner signed documents: all dated at Providence. [1] Autograph from 1791, 1.5 x 4 inches; [2] Writ of Clark & Nightingale vs. Richard Knight of Cranston for recovery of monies owed. October 24, 1791. 7 x 8 in., official seal; [3] Writ of George Robinson vs. Nathan Newell and Welcome Pigsley for monies owed. 6.5 x 8 inches.. December 5, 1796; [4] Writ of Brown & Ives vs. Nathan Willson for money owed by note. March 1797. 6.5 x 8 inches; [5] Writ of Amos M. Atwell, William Wilkinson, and Samuel W. Green, Managers of the First Congregational Meeting House Lottery vs George Streeter for non performance. Signed on verso by Nathaniel Searle, Jun. April 13, 1797. 6.5 x 8 inches, docketed on verso. James Fenner (1771-1846) was an assemblyman in the late 1790s and Governor of Rhode Island beginning in 1807 and served until 1831. 10) Ray Greene signed documents: [1] Note regarding a petition of Ezra Luther to Hon. Judge Marchant. May 26, 1795. 8 x 13 inches, folded in half; [2] autograph letter signed to Benjamin Bourne concerning Federalism and a bill before the House. Philadelphia, July 6, 1798. 8 x 10 inches, 2 pp. Born in Warwick, Rhode Island, Greene was a son of William Greene and Catharine Ray. His father was a governor of Rhode Island during the Revolutionary War, and his mother was a correspondent of Benjamin Franklin. Greene pursued classical studies and graduated from Yale College in 1784, then studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Providence. He was Attorney General of Rhode Island from 1794 to 1797, and in the latter year was elected as a Federalist to the United States Senate. He was designated a district judge of Rhode Island by President John Adams, but, through a technicality, was not appointed. Benjamin Bourne (1755-1808) was a lawyer, U.S. Congressman and jurist, of Bristol and Providence, R.I. 11) William Greene signed documents: [1] Docketed "Copy of three different lists as given to the Gen. appointed to take an estimate..." concerning list of "William Green Esq. of Warwick" estate. September 25, 1779. 8 x 12.5 inches. Folds, bright ink; [2] autograph letter signed to Judge Henry Marchant concerning non-payment of a debt by Ray Sands of Block Island. Warwick, March 7, 1787. 8 x 12 inches, 4 pp. Repair at fold. Bright ink. The first document may describe his own estates. The second is an interesting and lengthy letter concerning a land sale of lots on Block Island for which he has to recover unpaid debt. Greene mentions that he has hurt his leg and may not personally be able to appear in court but that he will send his son to represent him. William Greene (1731-1809) was born in Warwick to Governor William and Catharine (Greene) Greene. He spent much of his life in public service and also ran a farm in Warwick. Greene started in public service as a Deputy in the General Assembly in 1773. He was involved with Rhode Island's efforts during the Revolutionary War, first as a member of the Council of War and then as Governor. He also served as a Justice in the Superior Court. In 1762, he married Catharine, daughter of Simon and Deborah (Greene) Ray of Block Island and died in Warwick on November 29, 1809. 12). Jeremiah Olney, signed Ship's manifest. Custom House, Providence, October 20, 1792. 7.5 x 13 inches. Folds, previous repairs on verso with tape, showing through. Manifest of the cargo outbound on board Sloop Fanny, Tillinghast, Master, bound to New York. Also signed by John Tillinghast. Jeremiah Olney (1749-1812) was collector for the district of Providence and also the Colonel of the First Rhode Island Regiment during the last years of the American Revolution. 13) Overing and Auchmuty to Hazard and Robinson in Charleston concerning sale of cargo. Providence, December 15, 1792. Sheet 8 x 11 inches, folded with integral address on verso, hole at seal. Letter showing trade relationship of some of the major Rhode Island shipping merchants. The firm of Hazard & Robinson sent this letter via ship to Charleston with Martin Benson, shipmaster, (connected to Brown, Benson and Ives) containing directions to sell a load of brandy for about $512. Overing and Auchmuty, who were related by marriage, ran a merchant firm out of New York. In 1789, Rowland Hazard had in connection with his cousin, Stephen Ayrault Robinson, established a mercantile business in Charleston, South Carolina, under the firm name of Hazard & Robinson. As a consequence he spent much of his time in Charleston, though he did not make it his permanent residence. The firm had consignments of merchandise from the North, and in looking after these business connections Mr. Hazard made his headquarters at his father's house in Rhode Island. It was, however, in Charleston that he met and married his wife, Mary Peace, in 1793, and it is evidence that he still regarded South Kingston as his home that he brought his bride to his father's house. [History of Washington and Kent Counties, Rhode Island by J. R. Cole W. W. Preston & Co., New York, 1889]. 14) Martin Page signed receipt from Welcome Arnold. Newport, Rhode Island, February 7, 1797. Docketed. Half sheet, 4.5 x 7.5 inches. Bright ink. Martin Page received $1000 from Welcome Arnold for the cargo in his ship Minerva to be delivered to Jon. Arnold in Charleston. Sea captain Martin Page (1772-1867) of Providence was the son of Thomas Page. He began sailing as a cabin boy at age 12, and eventually worked his way up to captain, spending 48 years at sea. For 33 years, he was employed by the mercantile firm of Brown & Ives, mostly as a ship's master and supercargo. "Welcome Arnold (1777-1821) was heavily involved in owning privateering vessels during the Revolutionary War, and lost over thirty of them. He subsequently made sure not to own any vessel outright, but to spread his ownership interest over many boats so as to lessen the risk. In 1788 Nicholas Brown and Welcome Arnold spent $25,000 to construct a rum distillery at Providence's Fox Point neighborhood. Apparently Welcome Arnold, like fellow Gaspee raider John Brown, dabbled in the triangle trade of rum for slaves for molasses for rum." [see "Papers of the American Slave Trade, Series A: Selections from the Rhode Island Historical Society"]. It's tempting to think this is a receipt for slaves. The Minerva was a known slave ship, and the receipt uses the phrase "cargo" without qualifiers, which often was a code of sorts for Africans. While I can find the Minerva on slavevoyages.org I cannot match either the dates or the captain, Martin Page. 15) Agreement to build a bridge over the Woonasquatucket River. Committee and signatories: James Petty, Richard Jackson, William Valentine, Stephen Olney, Elisha Angell. Providence, December 6, 1820. Sheets 8 x 10 inches, 4 pp. An interesting document that describes a bridge to be built over the "Wanascatucket river," half by Providence men and the other half to be built by Elisha Angell and Stephen Olney of North Providence. The bridge was to be eighteen feet wide and covered with chestnut plank. Many bridges in the area had to be rebuilt after the Great Gale of 1815--although we do not know if this document refers to a rebuild or a new proposal. The tide from the Great Gale had free flow up the Woonasquatucket river nearly to Richmond's Print Works, and the marsh on both sides was fully flooded. 16) Rhode Island General Assembly--two petitions. [1] concerning Samuel Gorton's estate. Signed by Richard Waterman, Clerk. October 18, 1725. Half sheet 5 x 7.5 inches; [2] Petition of Stephen Brown and Nancy his wife. October 31, 1829. 8 x 11 inches, signed: Thomas Rivers, Clerk and Henry Bowen, Secretary. Capt. John Greene's sister was the widow of Samuel Gorton. She had "insanity of mind" and apparently was incompetent to sell Gorton's land and estate. However, an addendum says "It is the opinion of this House that inasmuch as Mr John Greene (a relative by marriage) refuseth to act that the Town Council of Providence will nominate and empower the person to act... D. Updike." Samuel Gorton (1687-1723) was the son of Benjamin and Sarah (Cardner) Gorton and the grandson of Samuel Gorton, the founder of Warwick. The 1829 petition of "Stephen Brown and Nancy his wife setting forth that...Nancy is the sister of John Smith Carpenter, otherwise called John Carpenter, Jr, who sailed from this State in the privateer Blockade many years since and is supposed to be lost..." Stephen Brown begs to be appointed administrator of the estate. 17) John Rogers and Obadiah Brown vs. Josiah Hazard. Providence Inferior Court, June term, 1786. 7.5 x 13 inches, bound at left with string. 3 pp. Docketed. Edges slightly frayed. The firm of Brown, Rogers and Brown, merchants of Providence, made a complaint against Josiah Hazard, merchant and ship master of Newport, for indebtedness of ?400 pertaining to the cargo of the Ship Union. 18) Gold S. Silliman autograph letter signed to Peter Ayrault, merchant in Charleston, South Carolina, concerning a debt. Newport, February 19, 1805. 13 x 16 inches, previous folds, 2 pp. Integral address, postmarked. Fore-margin a little erose with loss to two or three words. Gold S. Silliman (1777-1868) was the administrator of the estate of Captain William Shaw and writes to Ayrault concerning an unpaid debt to Shaw before his death. Silliman was the son of Gold Selleck Silliman (1732-1790), a Yale University attorney and militia General during the Revolution. Gold, Jr. was a post master in Brooklyn. The debt owed was by "Hazard & Ayrault." Rowland Hazard (1763-1835) entered a mercantile partnership in 1789 with his first cousin John Robinson Jr. of Charleston, South Carolina. Peter Ayrault was admitted to the partnership in 1794, which then became known as Hazard, Robinson & Co. By 1796, business was being transacted under the name of "Hazard & Ayrault" but this partnership was dissolved around 1803. Hazard continued financing merchant voyages for most of his life largely along the Atlantic coast and the Caribbean, with Charleston, New York and Rhode Island serving as hubs, and his cargo included everything from salt to spermaceti oil to cheese. 19) Henry Smith signed documents: [1] Henry Smith to William Shattuck regarding a bill. Providence, August 5, 1797. Signed with initials. 7.25 x 9 inches. Previous folds; [2] Henry Smith to (Capt.) Clifford Crowninshield. Providence, November 22, 1797. 9 x 14 inches, folded in half, 3 pp. Docketed. Few ink spots, slight edge wear; [3] Henry Smith to John Brown concerning monies owed. September 27, 1798. 7.5 x 9 inches. Signature ink smeared; [4] Henry Smith to (Capt.) Stephen Olney promising building stones. Providence, October 24, 1798. Witnessed by Benjamin Smith. Colonel Henry Smith (1766-1818) was a Providence merchant. He was senior member of the Rhode Island Senate in 1805 and for a few years after served as acting governor of the state. The letter to Capt. Crowninshield details "I hope ere you receive this you will have the ship & cargo delivered to you--I know that nothing in your power will be wanting & there cannot be the least grounds for its not being American property unless the Damned English & Damned French Rascals mean to plunder & rob on the Land & in their Courts of Justice as they do on the Seas." He also inquires of his promised gold watch & chain, set of silver plate and other silver and tea ware, as well as an Encyclopedia Britannica and Voltaire's complete works. Smith's letter to John Brown (1736-1803) [the well- known merchant and acknowledged planner and leader of the attack on the Gaspee in 1772] is an interesting missive touching on difficulties in payment for his debt; " I offered the Geo. Washington to you, that you might not be a loser by me, when the Bank thot (sic) I was not worth a Copper...I had 4500 dolls by me when the Bank was going to break..." He appends a comment concerning some gossip: "... It has been told in your family that I have tattled disrespectfully of your daughters Abby & Sally & your son James--which I declare to be most malicious falsehood, & if there is a man that dare utter such a lie to my face I'll wrink his Nose--If a woman I have nothing to say--" 20) Daniel Tillinghast autograph letter signed to Benjamin Bourn in Philadelphia regarding disability of Capt. John B. Hopkins. Providence, February 12, 1796. Sheet 8 x 14 inches. Previous folds, integral address and docket on verso. Edge fraying, small holes at top and bottom, no loss. Daniel Tillinghast (1732-1806) was a Colonel in the Revolution and afterwards operated a shop in Providence which imported goods, especially brandy. He was also a trustee of Brown University and served on the Committee of Safety for Providence. He married Lydia Hopkins and therefore was likely a relative of the: "Mrs. Hopkins and her friends having requested me to add my Testimony concerning the disability which was sustained by Capt. John B. Hopkins while in command of the Brig Cabot..." Essentially, Tillinghast approved the Captain's request of a pension. Benjamin Bourne (1755-1808), Harvard lawyer, was the first Rhode Island Representative in Congress, elected to four successive terms before he resigned in 1796 to succeed Henry Marchant on the U.S. District Court of Rhode Island. 21) Lodowick Updike autograph letter signed to Benjamin Bourne in Bristol concerning a voyage of Capt. Cornel's. Newport, January 29, 1806. Sheets 8 x 10 inches, 2 pp. Folded with integral address, postmarked. Bright ink. The letter speaks of demands against Capt. Cornel's voyage to Havanna which cannot be satisfied since he did not make the trip. Updike hopes to settle any claims without a lawsuit. Lodowick Updike (1774-1833) was born in North Kingstown. He was a warden of St Paul's Church and a business man (possibly in the merchant trade). Capt. Cornel is likely the Captain Walter Cornell who drowned near Newport in 1819. Item #57640

Price: $3,500.00

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