The telephone: an account of the phenomena of electricity, magnetism, and sound, as involved in its action. With directions for making a speaking telephone. Prof Dolbear, mos, merson.
The telephone: an account of the phenomena of electricity, magnetism, and sound, as involved in its action. With directions for making a speaking telephone

The telephone: an account of the phenomena of electricity, magnetism, and sound, as involved in its action. With directions for making a speaking telephone

Boston: Lee & Shepard; New York: Charles L. Dillingham, 1877. First edition, 12mo, pp. [2], v-vi, 7-128; original pictorial brown cloth with an illustration of Dolbear's telephone; 17 figures in the text; front and back free endpapers excised; some pencil notations; otherwise very good. Pencil ownership inscription on front endpaper verso of Richard A. Engles, Nov. 4 1905, Chicago. Amos Emerson Dolbear (1837-1910) was an American physicist who invented and patented several telephone models. Around this period multiple inventors were concurrently developing similar or identical models, and in 1865 Dolbear lost his patent for a telephone with a permanent magnet to Alexander Graham Bell. Here Dolbear presents a summary of his first speaking telephone, providing information on the history and functionality of electricity, the science of acoustics, and how his telephone compares to those of his competitors. Item #57688

Price: $150.00

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