Midshipman's manuscript "Journal of a cruise in the U.S. Ship of the Line Columbus, bearing the broad pendant [sic] of Commodore Char[le]s W. Morgan," and a subsequent cruise on board the U.S. Sloop of War, Jamestown. G. D. Chenoweth.
Midshipman's manuscript "Journal of a cruise in the U.S. Ship of the Line Columbus, bearing the broad pendant [sic] of Commodore Char[le]s W. Morgan," and a subsequent cruise on board the U.S. Sloop of War, Jamestown
Midshipman's manuscript "Journal of a cruise in the U.S. Ship of the Line Columbus, bearing the broad pendant [sic] of Commodore Char[le]s W. Morgan," and a subsequent cruise on board the U.S. Sloop of War, Jamestown
Midshipman's manuscript "Journal of a cruise in the U.S. Ship of the Line Columbus, bearing the broad pendant [sic] of Commodore Char[le]s W. Morgan," and a subsequent cruise on board the U.S. Sloop of War, Jamestown
Midshipman's manuscript "Journal of a cruise in the U.S. Ship of the Line Columbus, bearing the broad pendant [sic] of Commodore Char[le]s W. Morgan," and a subsequent cruise on board the U.S. Sloop of War, Jamestown

Extensive U.S. Navy journal by a Kentucky midshipman

Midshipman's manuscript "Journal of a cruise in the U.S. Ship of the Line Columbus, bearing the broad pendant [sic] of Commodore Char[le]s W. Morgan," and a subsequent cruise on board the U.S. Sloop of War, Jamestown

At sea: 1842-45. Folio; 199, 101-200, [134] pages (approximately 433 pages in all); pen-and-ink title with an original drawing of a sailing vessel of war on the title page; a second drawing of Columbus occurs inside; contemporary full calf; gilt-decorated spine, decorative gilt borders on covers; written in a neat, legible hand; very good and sound. With the author’s name (Midshipman) "G. D. Chenoweth, U. S. Navy," stamped in gilt on the upper cover. U.S.S. Columbus was a 90-gun ship of the line in the United States Navy. She was launched on 1 March 1819 at the Washington Navy Yard and commissioned on 7 September 1819. Chenoweth, a Kentucky native, received his midshipman’s warrant on 19 October 1841. He died in April 1847, but where and from what is not clear. His journal is a lengthy and detailed record spanning the three years from August 1842 to August 1845. This is a fine example of a U.S. Navy midshipman's journal, proper, neat, and orderly. Chenoweth generally records one day's particulars per page, noting almost always location (at sea; Bay of Gibraltar, off Georgetown, Harbor of Rio de Janeiro, Navy Yard, Gosport, Va., Naval Anchorage, Norfolk, Porto Praya, Port Mahon, etc.); course sailed, nautical speed, and wind direction for each of the 24 hours in the day. These are followed by "Remarks" which, while at sea, are generally rather perfunctory and taking no more than 8-12 lines; but others are quite lengthy, especially when in a port-of-call, often running to multiple pages. At Port Mahon, for example, the remarks run to two-and-a-half pages at the first calling, and six pages at the second calling; at Toulon, two pages; at Genoa 22 pages (over a four-month layover); at Rio de Janeiro, 18 pages (over a two-and-a-half-month layover). Chenoweth commences his journal at Boston, August 3rd 1842, noting that at 3:30 p.m. on that day the 74-gun Ship of the Line Columbus was commissioned. [This is at variance with the Wikipedia entry on the ship.] He then lists the 60-odd officers, midshipmen, and mates who have reported for duty; Captain William A. Spencer is the commissioning commanding officer. The next three weeks are filled with entries reflecting preparations for the ship to deploy to the Mediterranean. Included are accounts of taking on provisions, and equipment (including "three boxes of books for the apprentice boys"), and the release of a minor back to his parents who had signed on illegally. "At one o'clock p.m. called hands to bend sails and bent the courses, topsails, jib, and spanker. Received stores in some of the departments. At 5 p.m. furl'd sails. Hoisted a red flag at the fore and received on board one hundred and twenty five barrels of powder. Transfered to the hospital Mr. McLaughlin ... and John Higgins. Received on board one box of books for the Seamans Library and two boxes for the Officers Library and one signal book in the Masters Department ... Received stores in the Carpenters and Gunners Departments ... Sent ten men to bury the mortal remains of Wm McLaughlin late attached to this ship ... Received in the Pursers Department five thousand dollars and some other articles ... received on board fresh beef and a quantity of vegetables ... At 1 o'clock called all hands to unmoor the ship and hove up the larb'd anchor. Sent the mortal remains to the Ohio to be sent to the hospital for interment, and Robert Bennett ... William Gibson ... and Thos. Jenkins to the hospital for medical treatment. At 3 o'clock hove up the starboard anchor and cast with the jib, flying jib and fore-topmast staysail. Passed the Ohio. She cheered us which we cheerfully returned. Fired a parting salute of 17 guns ... At 5 o'clock hove to outside of the harbor when the pilot Wilson left the ship with a bag of letters..." The Columbus arrived in Gibraltar on 30 September, departed on 5 October, was joined by the frigate Congress at sea on 12 October, and arrived at Port Mahon on 17 October where Commodore Charles Morgan was waiting aboard the sloop of war Fairfield. With the sloop of war Preble and Congress in company, Morgan, now on the Columbus, sailed in late October for Genoa where he remained for over four months. On the 24th of February 1843 Captain Abraham Bigelow assumed Command of Columbus. Chenoweth executes a lovely drawing of a sailing ship of war on the occasion, presumably the Columbus. Captain Bigelow reviews and approves of Chenoweth’s journal following the entry for 31 May 1843. Back in Gibraltar in June Captain Benjamin Cooper assumes command, and shortly thereafter Columbus departs for the Brazil station arriving in Rio on 30 July 1843 where Daniel Turner relieved Commodore Morgan. (Turner, a Congressional silver medal winner for gallantry at the 1813 battle on Lake Erie, had recently completed a three-year tour as commanding officer of Constitution on the Pacific station.) Ships variously joining Columbus on station included the frigates Brandywine and Columbia, and the schooners Enterprise and Lexington. Columbus arrived at Montevideo in October and returned to Rio de Janeiro in January 1844 where she was joined by the frigate Raritan, the sloops James Adams and Boston, and the brigs Chipola and Perry. [All these arrivals and departures are duly recorded in the journal.] The next day Columbus departed for New York arriving there in late May where Chenoweth apparently detached on or soon after 6 June 1844, that being the date of the last entry on Columbus. Chenoweth was then ordered to the sloop-of-war Jamestown under construction at Gosport. Jamestown was launched on 16 September 1844 and commissioned on Christmas day of that year, Robert B. Cunningham, commanding. The journal resumes following two very interesting pages detailing the specifications of Jamestown (some very detailed), as well as the ship's stores and equipment. Daily entries recommence on 19 December 1844, at Norfolk. Chenoweth records the visit of Secretary of the Navy John Mason on 2 January 1845, and the hoisting of the Broad Pennant of Commodore Charles W. Skinner on 23 January as Jamestown departed Norfolk in company with Portsmouth bound for the African station. Arriving in the Cape Verde islands on the 15th of February Jamestown exchanges salutes and visits with Commodore M. C. Perry on the Macedonian. After several months on the African station the journal ends abruptly on 28 August 1845, Jamestown at Porto Grande in the Verde Islands. Item #58745

Price: $3,500.00

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