Item #58789 The botanist. Being the botanical part of a course of lectures on natural history, delivered in the University at Cambridge. Together with a discourse on the principle of vitality. Benjamin Waterhouse.
The botanist. Being the botanical part of a course of lectures on natural history, delivered in the University at Cambridge. Together with a discourse on the principle of vitality
The botanist. Being the botanical part of a course of lectures on natural history, delivered in the University at Cambridge. Together with a discourse on the principle of vitality
The botanist. Being the botanical part of a course of lectures on natural history, delivered in the University at Cambridge. Together with a discourse on the principle of vitality

The botanist. Being the botanical part of a course of lectures on natural history, delivered in the University at Cambridge. Together with a discourse on the principle of vitality

Boston: published by Joseph T. Buckingham, Winter-Street, 1811. 8vo, pp. xiv, [1], 16-262; original blue paper-covered boards neatly rebacked, old spine label preserved; good and sound. With a hand-made, 19th-century gray paper dust jacket on which a signature "Elijah Hamlin / Paris." With the ownership signature of "E. L. Hamlin May, 1820." Elijah Livermore Hamlin (1800-1872) of Androscoggin County, Maine, was the older brother of future Vice President of the United States Hannibal Hamlin. He graduated from Brown University in 1819, studied law, and was admitted to the bar. The book is dedicated to John Adams, President of the United States, and Waterhouse's roommate. Waterhouse (1754-1846) was born and raised in Newport, Rhode Island, studied in both London and Edinburgh, and lived with John Adams in Leyden. Later, he was a professor of physic at Harvard became professor of the Harvard Medical School while lecturing at Rhode Island College [i.e. Brown University]. He was the first doctor to test the smallpox vaccine in the United States, applying it to four of his children. He is considered the most famous physician native to Newport. "As early as 1782 he suggested the formation of a humane society in Rhode Island, similar to those already active in Europe, and in 1785 he drew up plans, with Dr. Henry Moyes of Edinburgh, for the Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. After some friction with other founding members, he gave a discourse, June 8, 1790, on The Principle of Vitality, showing the importance of long-continued artificial respiration" (DAB). "In addition to being the leading early champion of vaccination in America, he was the most important popularizer of science in New England from the 1780s to the early 1800s, the leading link between Boston and the British medical community during the quarter century after the revolutionary war, and an important literary figure" (ANBO). American Imprints 24380. Item #58789

Price: $600.00

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