The Tatler. Numb. 33. By Mrs. Jenny Distaff, half sister to Mr. Bickerstaff [i.e. Richard Steele]

The Tatler. Numb. 33. By Mrs. Jenny Distaff, half sister to Mr. Bickerstaff [i.e. Richard Steele]

London: From Thursday Jiune 23 to Saturday June 25, sold by John Morphew near Stationers-Hall; where advertisements are taken in, 1709. Broadsheet, 13¼" x 7¾", pp. [2]; 2 columns per page; trimmed close but no loss; slight toning and spotting. "The Tatler was a British literary and society journal begun by Richard Steele in 1709 and published for two years. It represented a new approach to journalism, featuring cultivated essays on contemporary manners, and established the pattern that would be copied in such British classics as Addison and Steele's Spectator, Samuel Johnson's Rambler and Idler, and Goldsmith's Citizen of the World." (Wikipedia). "In The Tatler, Richard Steele created the character of Jenny Distaff, the columnist’s sister. Jenny wished to contribute to her brother’s journal in his absence and claimed that, being a woman, she had the credentials to write essays addressing a female audience. Yet Jenny’s writing career was short, to make sure that her taking up the pen should not be interpreted as an encouragement to disturb the gender hierarchy. She soon returned to her ‘proper’ world by marrying one of her brother’s friends. And once married, she wrote only occasionally, to describe the delights and duties of the state of matrimony" (gale[dot]com). To her essay in this issue she writes in a P.S. "I have Ten Millions of Things more against Men, if I ever get the Pen again." Item #58991

Price: $100.00

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