Andreas und Elene. Jacob Grimm.
Andreas und Elene
Andreas und Elene
Andreas und Elene
Andreas und Elene
Andreas und Elene

Andreas und Elene

Cassel: Theodor Fischer, 1840. First edition, 8vo, pp. lviii, 181, [1]; folded insert facsimile of text of Andreas in Anglo-Saxon. These two poems from the late seventh/early eighth centuries are from the "Vercelli Codex," a book of Anglo-Saxon poetry preserved in the cathedral library at Vercelli, discovered in 1832. They were originally written in the Northumbrian dialect, but copied into the West Saxon dialect of the tenth century. Grimm's publication of "Andreas" and "Elene" are there first appearance in print. Grimm considers these two poems to be the oldest and most instructive works in Anglo-Saxon after Beowulf. In 1840 Grimm discovered that the author of "Elene" was Cynewulf, through the deciphering of runic letters interwoven with the text near the end of the poem. Coincidentally in 1840, Kemble discovered that Cynewulf was the author of "Crist" and "Juliana," two Anglo-Saxon poems in the "Exeter Codex" in the cathedral library of Exeter, through the same means as Grimm. "Elene" is considered to be Cynewulf's finest poem. "Andreas" has been attributed to Cynewulf, but reliable scholarship discredits his possible authorship. More likely a follower of Cynewulf wrote the poem. Bound with: Zupitza, Julius. Cynewulf's Elene mit einem Glossar. Berlin: Wiedmannsche Buchhandlung, 1877. 8vo, pp. xi, [1], 100; 31 pages (up to section XII of the poem) with a student's neat and extensive gloss in pencil into modern English. "Elene" is a poem in Old English, that is sometimes known as "Saint Helena Finds the True Cross." It is the longest of Cynewulf's four signed poems. Bound with: Cockayne, T. Oswald. Narratiunculae Anglice conscriptae. De pergamenis exscribebas notis illustrabat eruditis copiam. Venales apud Iohannem R. Smith, Soho Square, 1861. 8vo, pp. [4], iv, 87, [1]. Anglo-Saxon texts, with Latin texts of Epistola Alexandri, Derbus in Oriente, and Mambres Magieus. Preface and notes in Latin. Cockayne (1807-73) was for many years an assistant-master in King's College School, London, which post he resigned in 1869. He died in 1873. Throughout the greater part of his life he was an industrious student of the Anglo-Saxon language, on which subject he published several works, now out of print, which are characterised both by learning and originality. He was a member of the Philological and the Early English Text Societies. Together, 3 volumes in 1, contemporary brown morocco over modern boards; the first title slightly foxed; joints and spine rather rubbed, small crack at the top of the spine, but the binding is sound. Item #60656

Price: $375.00

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