The moon hoax; or, a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings...illustrated with a view of the moon, as seen by Lord Rosse's telescope. Richard Adams Locke.
The moon hoax; or, a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings...illustrated with a view of the moon, as seen by Lord Rosse's telescope

Immortal journalistic stunt

The moon hoax; or, a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings...illustrated with a view of the moon, as seen by Lord Rosse's telescope

New York: William Gowans, 1859. First edition thus, 8vo, pp. vi, [1], 8-63, [1]; wood-engraved frontispiece of the moon; very good copy in original printed wrappers, wrappers lose, but present. An old bookseller's clipping laid in to another copy of the book we have handled notes that this is "one of the immortal journalistic stunts of the 19th century." Locke, an editor of the N.Y. Sun in 1835, quintupled the circulation of his paper by running a fictitious report of Herschel's lunar discoveries at the Cape of Good Hope. It deceived the entire country for weeks and established The Sun as a daily paper. OCLC similarly notes: "A series of articles originally published in the New York Sun, August, 1835, under title, "Great astronomical discoveries," which purported to be an account of the discoveries of Sir John Herschel at the Cape of Good Hope, and which pretended to be reprinted from a supplement to the Edinburgh Journal of Science (then defunct). Has been ascribed on insufficient evidence to Joseph Nicolas Nicollet." Item #60682

Price: $500.00

See all items in American Literature, Science
See all items by