Item #60906 Pomme d'anis, ou l'histoire d'une jeune fille infirme. Francis Jammes.
Pomme d'anis, ou l'histoire d'une jeune fille infirme
Pomme d'anis, ou l'histoire d'une jeune fille infirme

Inscribed by Henri-Pierre Roché

Pomme d'anis, ou l'histoire d'une jeune fille infirme

Paris: Société du Mercure de France, 1904. 16mo, pp. 169, [1]; later blue paper-covered boards, spine title in manuscript; first and last leaves used as pastedowns; pages uniformly toned; good and sound. This copy with a presentation inscription at the top of the title page "à mademoisellle Tessie Jones en souvenir du diner de Noël 1922 homage respecteux, H. P. Roche." Tessie was the daughter of the famed collector of rare Americana, Herschel V. Jones, of Minneapolis, and herself the author of Bagatelles (Paris, 1926) illustrated by Robert Bonfils. Henri-Pierre Roché (1879-1959) was a French author who was involved with the artistic avant-garde in Paris and the Dada movement. Following his studies in Paris, he became by turns a journalist, an art collector, and dealer. "At the turn of the 20th century, he became close friends with young European artists in the Montparnasse Quarter of Paris including Manuel Ortiz de Zárate and Marie Vassilieff; and from Montmartre, Max Jacob and Pablo Picasso. He was at home in the world of artists, collectors and gallerists. In November 1905, he introduced the Americans Gertrude Stein, and her brother Leo, to Picasso. "Late in life, Roché published two novels: his first was Jules et Jim (1953), a semi-autobiographical work published when he was 74. His second novel, Les deux anglaises et le continent (Two English Girls, 1956), was also inspired by his life. Both were adapted as films by the director François Truffaut, in 1962 and 1971 respectively. The popularity of the film Jules and Jim brought renewed attention to Roché's novels and life" (Wikipedia). Item #60906

Price: $150.00

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