Item #64335 Nomo-lexikon: a law-dictionary. Interpreting such difficult and obscure words and terms, as are found either in our common or statute, ancient or modern lawes ... and etymologies, where they properly occur. Thomas Blount.
Nomo-lexikon: a law-dictionary. Interpreting such difficult and obscure words and terms, as are found either in our common or statute, ancient or modern lawes ... and etymologies, where they properly occur
Nomo-lexikon: a law-dictionary. Interpreting such difficult and obscure words and terms, as are found either in our common or statute, ancient or modern lawes ... and etymologies, where they properly occur
Nomo-lexikon: a law-dictionary. Interpreting such difficult and obscure words and terms, as are found either in our common or statute, ancient or modern lawes ... and etymologies, where they properly occur

Nomo-lexikon: a law-dictionary. Interpreting such difficult and obscure words and terms, as are found either in our common or statute, ancient or modern lawes ... and etymologies, where they properly occur

In the Savoy: printed by Tho. Newcomb, for John Martin and Henry Herringman, at the sign of the Bell in S. Pauls Churchyard, and a little without Temple-Bar, and in the New Exchange, 1670. First edition, folio, 6 preliminary leaves and unpaginated lexicon in double column and with the final leaf of corrigenda; collating A² a-b² B-3Z² chi¹; entry words in black letter, columns ruled; full contemporary calf rebacked, green morocco label on spine; a good, sound copy. Early ownership inscription on flyleaf of John Brandroth (possibly John Bandreth, the former Archdeacon of Killaloe and Dean of Armagh (1731-1736), and Dean of Emly from 1736 until 1765); bookplates of Richard Corbet upside down on rear pastedown, and Corbet Corbet on the front pastedown. "The Corbet family is an English family of Anglo-Norman extraction that became one of the most powerful and richest of the landed gentry in Shropshire. They trace their ancestry to two barons found in the 1086 Domesday Book" (Wikipedia). A second edition appeared in 1691 and it was subsequently appropriated by Edward Phillips. Blount (1618-1679), a barrister of the Inner Temple and a Roman Catholic, also published the Glossographia (1656), Fragmenta Antiquitatis (1679) and the Academie of Eloquence (1654). In 1667 he edited John Rastell's Terms of the Law (Les Termes de la Lay), a respected bilingual legal dictionary, which undoubtedly served as a stepping stone to the compilation of his own legal lexicon three years later (see Starnes & Noyes). Alston XVIII, part 2, 72; Vancil, p. 26; Wing B-3340. Item #64335

Price: $1,500.00

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